For the Love of Kids

Death Education in School

The impact of loss or death on a student may lead to impairment of academic performance, reduction of the student’s attention span, behaviour problems such as attention-seeking, acting-out, aggressive or withdrawn behaviour, apathy, depression, complaints of illness or pain that seem to lack any physical cause.

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Death Education for Children 

Things such as the loss of a friendship, the loss of a pet, moving schools (and losing friends), abuse, and rejection can be sources of loss.

The Community Center for Death Care and Education provides a proactive approach to help prepare children of all ages for losses that they will inevitably encounter, providing them with the tools needed to face significant losses in the healthiest way possible. 

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Loss from a Child's Perspective 

By Dr Bill Webster

“My mother died when I was 5 years old. I felt like I was insignificant, as if I was getting smaller and smaller… so unimportant that I might disappear. It’s very hard to explain, but I believed I was wrong, somehow. For years I felt like I was on the outside of things, even though others would not have thought I was.” Sally, 35, who lost her mother.

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Helping Children Cope

By Dr Bill Webster

An important influence on children is watching how adults are responding. Caring adults can help guide children through this difficult time and make it a valuable part of personal growth and development. When you support children through these difficult life transitions, they will know without a doubt they are not alone. There is no greater gift we can give our children.

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